Dakota Johnson hosts SNL

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Dakota Johnson, the star of FIFTY SHADES OF GREY hosted Saturday Night Live last week.

DK

She was funny and seemed ready for the stardom she has recently acquired. In one classic sketch she and Christian Grey (played by Kyle Mooney) met with construction workers redoing their “play room”. The workers assured them that they added 12 new “weener holes” to the wall. Dakota was a controversial choice to star in FSOG but she showed chops in an appearance in the SOCIAL NETWORK, opposite Justin Timberlake in a sexy Stanford underwear scene. She also showed comedy range in THE FIVE YEAR ENGAGEMENT. She hales from top Hollywood pedigree. Her parents are the uber-famous Melanie Griffith and Don Johnson. Her Grandmother is Tipi Hedren, the beautiful Alfred Hitchcock heroine most known for her starring role in the THE BIRDS. Dakota and her mother had an endearing interview at the Oscars where Griffith stated she didn’t want to see FSOG because of its sultry nature. It’s funny she feels that way as she definitely used her sexiness to bolster her career. She has done many nude scenes (check out her 80’s film BODY DOUBLE) and even did a Playboy pictorial.

Dakota’s parents even made a cameo in her opening monologue for her SNL appearance which was awkward but funny. It was made apparent that Melanie hosted SNL exactly 9 months before Dakota was born which would indicate that she possibly was conceived the night her mother hosted.

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Author: drmaxmccullen

When Max McCullen first read Alfred Kinsey’s landmark book, Sexual Behavior In the Human Male, he began contemplating why so little is known about human sexuality. Since its publication in 1948 that body of knowledge has grown marginally. Why do we think about sex all the time? How much does sex really influence our behavior? And why do we still know so little about it? He completed undergraduate studies at University of the Pacific and The University of London and then his research led him to the Institute for the Advanced Study of Human Sexuality in San Francisco. IASHS was founded by Kinsey’s research assistant, Wardell Pomeroy. His initial curiosity soon evolved into a passion, which drove him to acquire his Doctorate of Education in Human Sexuality and Gender Studies. In 2004 Dr. Max began working for GlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals (GSK), one of the largest pharmaceutical companies worldwide. This experience contributed to his understanding of medical treatments for male sexual dysfunction. He became familiar with how Viagra, Levitra, and Cialis function on a biological level and their social implications. His expertise naturally transitioned into him working with some of the most prestigious Urology offices in Southern California. These doctors and passionate medical personal, illustrated firsthand the impact treatment of male sexual dysfunction can have on patient care and their overall well being. This experience made him yearn for more direct contact with patients in a clinical setting. So after GSK he worked with Boston Medical Group (BMG), an international, clinic based organization, comprised of board certified Urologists and other specialties. BMG focuses on low libido, erectile dysfunction, premature ejaculation and testosterone replacement therapy. With BMG, Dr. Max was not only their spokesperson doing radio interviews and lecturing but worked as the physician liaison connecting patients with doctors for treatment. He also worked as a consultant for University Specialty Urologicals, based in San Diego, meeting with Urologists all over the west coast to train them on various treatments for men and women's sexual health issues, including hormone replacement therapy. During this time he also hosted online webinars for patients with questions; he also has a written and video blog series and does private consultation for patients. Dr. Max McCullen brings a historical knowledge of the human sexuality field together with the reailties of living in a digital age. “The issues that confronted our elders in the 50’s and 60’s are different today - but no more impactful. Where they were learning about their sexuality and beginning to embark into the sexual revolution we are over exposed to the commodification of sex. This makes the navigation of sex and emotional intimacy difficult” Dr. Max McCullen

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